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The Trailer Started: Very Strange Cars With One-volume Bodies

The Trailer Started: Very Strange Cars With One-volume Bodies
The Trailer Started: Very Strange Cars With One-volume Bodies

Video: The Trailer Started: Very Strange Cars With One-volume Bodies

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No matter how bold and unusual the design of modern cars is, we, as if out of habit, continue to draw hoods, fenders and trunks for them. We remembered projects from the distant past, in which all of the above was combined into one strange teardrop-shaped body, in comparison with which family vans and compact monocabs of the 21st century seem to be blinkered modest ones without a drop of invention. What are these cars and why were they like this?

Dymaxion

The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies

At the dawn of the last century, the classic layout of the passenger car as a whole seemed complete. Laconic Mercedes-Benz and BMW, lush-winged Chevrolet and Bugatti with long bonnet noses appeared. However, some manufacturers did not support such a scheme and went their own way. The bodies of their cars were built on a frame and frames, the balance along the axes was provided by a "swing", where the engine located at the rear balanced the driver at the front wheels, and the reference streamlining was achieved by rounding the body to the state of a bar of soap. In this sense, the "wagon" VW T1 on the chassis of the "Beetle" professed a similar layout religion, but was not creative enough. In 1933, American designer Richard Buckminster Fuller introduced a teardrop-shaped car called the Dymaxion, which actually ushered in a vibrant era of fish cars.

The six-meter Dymaxion was based on a tricky frame, had a rear-engined layout with an 85-horsepower Ford V-unit, front-wheel drive and … only three wheels, of which the only one was rear-controlled. The driver sat on the nose of the car, and the passenger module was located behind the partition. The body of the trailer, in an aviation manner, had a wooden frame and was sheathed with aluminum panels. Interestingly, with its visual massiveness, the Dymaxion weighed less than the modern KiPicanto and could accelerate to 140 kilometers per hour.

Stout scarab

The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies

No less interesting is the Scarab project from the Stout Motor Car Company from Detroit. If you've played old GTA-2, you probably noticed these pot-bellied limousines in the traffic of the criminal city. The Scarab prototype appeared in the early 30s and technically did not differ much from Fuller's "Daimaxion". Unless there were four wheels, and the body was made of metal, with fiberglass elements. The powertrain, by the way, was a similar 85-horsepower V8 from Ford.

Salon "Scarab" as a whole resembled limousines, got off with expensive leather, wood and was equipped with a folding table. In the back there was a spacious sofa, and in front of it there were separate chairs that could be freely moved around the cabin. In addition to the layout tricks, there were also technical ones, such as an independent air suspension with individual compressors for each shock absorber. For all the time, the company has collected only 11 cars worth about five thousand dollars per copy. Yes, this mini-trailer came out several times more expensive than the then Chryslers and Fords with the usual layout, and its fate was a foregone conclusion.

McQuay-Norris

The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies

The teardrop-shaped Streamliner of 1934 with the "Ford" V8 was also informal, but did not rush to the conveyor at all. The streamlined body made of wood and aluminum sheets, nicknamed the "aluminum egg", was created for promotional purposes and hid the units for testing and running, as well as equipment for measurements. The Streamliners that traveled around the States were both an advertisement and a mobile laboratory, checking the performance of McQuay-Norris branded piston rings and the composition of exhaust gases on the fly. Both the case and the show for the American public.

Arrowhead Teardrop Car

The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies

Another funny tadpole is a promo car from Wellington designer Everett Miller and Advanced Body Company. A teardrop car with three wheels, a V8 engine at the rear and a tail-tapering wood and aluminum body was to be the trade engine for the Arrowhead Spring Water Company, which sold drinking water. In order to stir up the American public in the depressed 30s, Arrowhead demanded something special that instantly stood out in the stream. Hence - both the body-drop, and the central fish fin of the promomobile.Notice how interesting this trailer drove and how convincingly it spun around in empty parking lots in Los Angeles.

Schlorwagen Pillbug

The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies

The complicated name gives a great hint: this Pillbug was created in Germany. In 1936, engineer Karl Schler designed an ultra-streamlined car, and two years later, with the support of the Institute of Aerodynamics in Göttingen, exhibited the prototype at the Berlin Motor Show, where the English giant Rolls-Royce Wraith was considered "streamlined" with the most classic layout.

In the features of the German "drop" solidity was felt. The body on the Mercedes-Benz 170H sedan chassis was made of aluminum and had a record drag coefficient of 0.186; better than today's record-breaking VW XL1. The salon boasted soft finishes and stylish solutions, and as a power unit - already during the war - an external propeller 130-horsepower engine from the aircraft was considered. But the Second World War did not give Schler's car a chance for a serial future.

Future car

The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies
The trailer started: very strange cars with one-volume bodies

And this weird little eared eagle is from Sweden, moreover, in the later 50s of the last century. The creator of the project, a young designer at that time, Sigward Berggren, used in his "Car of the Future" a combination of the chassis of the pre-war Dodge taxi, the unchanged Ford V8 engine for similar projects, and a frame made of light metal pipes, inspired by aviation and acting as a safety cage in the event of a rollover. Berggren himself considered his Future Car to be advanced in the field of passive safety, although outwardly the "miracle" with developed air intakes resembled a wingless aircraft during the war or a giant fish thrown ashore. Soon the engineer cooled down to his creation, and the "machine of the future" did not receive the very future.

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