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The Most Unusual Mobile Homes

The Most Unusual Mobile Homes
The Most Unusual Mobile Homes

Video: The Most Unusual Mobile Homes

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Mobile Homes That Will Blow Your Mind! 2023, February
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There seems to be nothing more boring in the automotive world than RVs. For the most part, these large things are similar to each other and resemble giant containers. But it was not always so. Many, many years ago, autocampers knew how to surprise not only with their living space, but also with their appearance. Just look how cool "movable real estate" was in the good old days.

Mini wildgoose

The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes

The charming house on an Austin Mini chassis was built in 1964 by Wildgoose Ltd from Surrey. Despite the toy appearance, these campers were intended for elderly couples who were ready to take a trip at any moment. The slogan read: “Go wherever you want! Stay where you want! " By sixties standards, the 35-horsepower Mini's living space was a smart, modern space for four, with full bunk beds, a gas stove, a sink, window shades, a luggage compartment, and a telescopic roof for sleeping under the stars. Of the fifty campers built, about a dozen have survived.

Pontiac six

The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes

The hopelessly classic 60-horsepower 1936 Pontiac can be considered the first British camper. Why "British" when it comes to the "Pontiac"? It's simple: an alteration of the American chassis was ordered at the Russell studio, Kent, for a certain Captain Dunn. Being confined to a wheelchair, the aristocrat Dunn wanted to move around in comfort, and since the studio was engaged in carriages and buses, it was difficult to think of anything other than a mobile home. The body for the car was created anew, and the chassis with the units remained native, American. The inline 4-liter "six" of Pontiac, and the nose, and even a mascot figure on the hood of the car have been preserved.

Hunt house car

The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes

Despite the body shape, the sleek 1936 camper was not built for speed records - it was a true RV. And its creator, the famous director Jay Roy Hunt, naturally lived in it, often moving around the States. It makes sense that House Car became the first autocamp with a working shower and toilet. Built exclusively for personal use, the mini-house based on the 1937 Ford was subsequently produced in small series: according to various sources, about fifty of them were made.

Rectrans Discoverer

The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes

Larry Shinoda, the author of the Mustang Boss 302 and the first Corvette Sting Ray, also had this kind of work in his portfolio. And you shouldn't be ashamed of a big house: the wedge-shaped Discoverer of 1971 divided the crowd of caravaners into boring and advanced ones, showing where the design should be developed. Connoisseurs of 70s automotive America will notice that the camper is based on the Dodge - more precisely, the M350 model. The visually massive body is relatively light: the angular panels were made of fiberglass and did not overload the frame. But the filling had weight: a complete and furnished Discoverer weighed four and a half tons. That, however, did not stop him from accelerating to a hundred in 11 seconds and spending about 20 liters per 100 km. The "culprit" of dynamics and efficiency was the very body that first visited the wind tunnel. By the way, take a closer look: there are no front doors here, and the door on the passenger side serves as the "entrance".

Star streak

The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes

A search for the word "starstreak" yields a bunch of weapons - and to hell with them. Firstly, the Star Streak camper is not very famous: there were very few cars. And secondly, the product of Paul Jones from Florida is naturally lethal! Many projects were built on the Cadillac chassis, but in this case they took the basis from the Eldorado, added an engine from the Oldsmobile Toronado coupe, a lot of non-ferrous metal, furniture and got a living space with chrome, gold and gas burners. And in this case, the filling is secondary: the 40-year-old motorhome looks so cool that you just don't want to be distracted from the exterior.

Phoenix camper van

The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes

If you watched the picture "Total Recall" with Schwarzenegger, be aware that the futuristic red "block" on wheels was not a props for filming.The real Phoenix was based on VW van chassis, and the surprisingly lightweight body panels could open like petals, transforming the rear into a spacious living compartment with a soft awning. It was assumed that such a "Phoenix" could be built by yourself for about $ 2,000: all that was required was the base from the Volkswagen, the roll cage and panels. But, as they say, it didn’t work.

Airstream 350 LE Class A

The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes
The most unusual mobile homes

The pot-bellied, invariably chrome-plated body of the American Airstream is mounted on an eight-wheel base from a Chevrolet truck. The length of such a mobile home was not weak: over 10 meters. As a result, space and scope reigned in the cabin. The richly equipped interior boasted a living room with leather sofas, a spacious shower area, a kitchen and a full bedroom with a wide bed, from where it is almost impossible to shout to the driver - the distance is too great. In a sense, the 350 LE has outgrown the concept of a camper. Perhaps this is already a hotel on wheels - only without an address and connection to Airbnb.

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